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Bob The Magic Custodian



Summary: Everyone knows that when you give your assets to someone else, they always keep them safe. If this is true for individuals, it is certainly true for businesses.
Custodians always tell the truth and manage funds properly. They won't have any interest in taking the assets as an exchange operator would. Auditors tell the truth and can't be misled. That's because organizations that are regulated are incapable of lying and don't make mistakes.

First, some background. Here is a summary of how custodians make us more secure:

Previously, we might give Alice our crypto assets to hold. There were risks:

But "no worries", Alice has a custodian named Bob. Bob is dressed in a nice suit. He knows some politicians. And he drives a Porsche. "So you have nothing to worry about!". And look at all the benefits we get:
See - all problems are solved! All we have to worry about now is:
It's pretty simple. Before we had to trust Alice. Now we only have to trust Alice, Bob, and all the ways in which they communicate. Just think of how much more secure we are!

"On top of that", Bob assures us, "we're using a special wallet structure". Bob shows Alice a diagram. "We've broken the balance up and store it in lots of smaller wallets. That way", he assures her, "a thief can't take it all at once". And he points to a historic case where a large sum was taken "because it was stored in a single wallet... how stupid".
"Very early on, we used to have all the crypto in one wallet", he said, "and then one Christmas a hacker came and took it all. We call him the Grinch. Now we individually wrap each crypto and stick it under a binary search tree. The Grinch has never been back since."

"As well", Bob continues, "even if someone were to get in, we've got insurance. It covers all thefts and even coercion, collusion, and misplaced keys - only subject to the policy terms and conditions." And with that, he pulls out a phone-book sized contract and slams it on the desk with a thud. "Yep", he continues, "we're paying top dollar for one of the best policies in the country!"
"Can I read it?' Alice asks. "Sure," Bob says, "just as soon as our legal team is done with it. They're almost through the first chapter." He pauses, then continues. "And can you believe that sales guy Mike? He has the same year Porsche as me. I mean, what are the odds?"

"Do you use multi-sig?", Alice asks. "Absolutely!" Bob replies. "All our engineers are fully trained in multi-sig. Whenever we want to set up a new wallet, we generate 2 separate keys in an air-gapped process and store them in this proprietary system here. Look, it even requires the biometric signature from one of our team members to initiate any withdrawal." He demonstrates by pressing his thumb into the display. "We use a third-party cloud validation API to match the thumbprint and authorize each withdrawal. The keys are also backed up daily to an off-site third-party."
"Wow that's really impressive," Alice says, "but what if we need access for a withdrawal outside of office hours?" "Well that's no issue", Bob says, "just send us an email, call, or text message and we always have someone on staff to help out. Just another part of our strong commitment to all our customers!"

"What about Proof of Reserve?", Alice asks. "Of course", Bob replies, "though rather than publish any blockchain addresses or signed transaction, for privacy we just do a SHA256 refactoring of the inverse hash modulus for each UTXO nonce and combine the smart contract coefficient consensus in our hyperledger lightning node. But it's really simple to use." He pushes a button and a large green checkmark appears on a screen. "See - the algorithm ran through and reserves are proven."
"Wow", Alice says, "you really know your stuff! And that is easy to use! What about fiat balances?" "Yeah, we have an auditor too", Bob replies, "Been using him for a long time so we have quite a strong relationship going! We have special books we give him every year and he's very efficient! Checks the fiat, crypto, and everything all at once!"

"We used to have a nice offline multi-sig setup we've been using without issue for the past 5 years, but I think we'll move all our funds over to your facility," Alice says. "Awesome", Bob replies, "Thanks so much! This is perfect timing too - my Porsche got a dent on it this morning. We have the paperwork right over here." "Great!", Alice replies.
And with that, Alice gets out her pen and Bob gets the contract. "Don't worry", he says, "you can take your crypto-assets back anytime you like - just subject to our cancellation policy. Our annual management fees are also super low and we don't adjust them often".

How many holes have to exist for your funds to get stolen?
Just one.

Why are we taking a powerful offline multi-sig setup, widely used globally in hundreds of different/lacking regulatory environments with 0 breaches to date, and circumventing it by a demonstrably weak third party layer? And paying a great expense to do so?
If you go through the list of breaches in the past 2 years to highly credible organizations, you go through the list of major corporate frauds (only the ones we know about), you go through the list of all the times platforms have lost funds, you go through the list of times and ways that people have lost their crypto from identity theft, hot wallet exploits, extortion, etc... and then you go through this custodian with a fine-tooth comb and truly believe they have value to add far beyond what you could, sticking your funds in a wallet (or set of wallets) they control exclusively is the absolute worst possible way to take advantage of that security.

The best way to add security for crypto-assets is to make a stronger multi-sig. With one custodian, what you are doing is giving them your cryptocurrency and hoping they're honest, competent, and flawlessly secure. It's no different than storing it on a really secure exchange. Maybe the insurance will cover you. Didn't work for Bitpay in 2015. Didn't work for Yapizon in 2017. Insurance has never paid a claim in the entire history of cryptocurrency. But maybe you'll get lucky. Maybe your exact scenario will buck the trend and be what they're willing to cover. After the large deductible and hopefully without a long and expensive court battle.

And you want to advertise this increase in risk, the lapse of judgement, an accident waiting to happen, as though it's some kind of benefit to customers ("Free institutional-grade storage for your digital assets.")? And then some people are writing to the OSC that custodians should be mandatory for all funds on every exchange platform? That this somehow will make Canadians as a whole more secure or better protected compared with standard air-gapped multi-sig? On what planet?

Most of the problems in Canada stemmed from one thing - a lack of transparency. If Canadians had known what a joke Quadriga was - it wouldn't have grown to lose $400m from hard-working Canadians from coast to coast to coast. And Gerald Cotten would be in jail, not wherever he is now (at best, rotting peacefully). EZ-BTC and mister Dave Smilie would have been a tiny little scam to his friends, not a multi-million dollar fraud. Einstein would have got their act together or been shut down BEFORE losing millions and millions more in people's funds generously donated to criminals. MapleChange wouldn't have even been a thing. And maybe we'd know a little more about CoinTradeNewNote - like how much was lost in there. Almost all of the major losses with cryptocurrency exchanges involve deception with unbacked funds.
So it's great to see transparency reports from BitBuy and ShakePay where someone independently verified the backing. The only thing we don't have is:
It's not complicated to validate cryptocurrency assets. They need to exist, they need to be spendable, and they need to cover the total balances. There are plenty of credible people and firms across the country that have the capacity to reasonably perform this validation. Having more frequent checks by different, independent, parties who publish transparent reports is far more valuable than an annual check by a single "more credible/official" party who does the exact same basic checks and may or may not publish anything. Here's an example set of requirements that could be mandated:
There are ways to structure audits such that neither crypto assets nor customer information are ever put at risk, and both can still be properly validated and publicly verifiable. There are also ways to structure audits such that they are completely reasonable for small platforms and don't inhibit innovation in any way. By making the process as reasonable as possible, we can completely eliminate any reason/excuse that an honest platform would have for not being audited. That is arguable far more important than any incremental improvement we might get from mandating "the best of the best" accountants. Right now we have nothing mandated and tons of Canadians using offshore exchanges with no oversight whatsoever.

Transparency does not prove crypto assets are safe. CoinTradeNewNote, Flexcoin ($600k), and Canadian Bitcoins ($100k) are examples where crypto-assets were breached from platforms in Canada. All of them were online wallets and used no multi-sig as far as any records show. This is consistent with what we see globally - air-gapped multi-sig wallets have an impeccable record, while other schemes tend to suffer breach after breach. We don't actually know how much CoinTrader lost because there was no visibility. Rather than publishing details of what happened, the co-founder of CoinTrader silently moved on to found another platform - the "most trusted way to buy and sell crypto" - a site that has no information whatsoever (that I could find) on the storage practices and a FAQ advising that “[t]rading cryptocurrency is completely safe” and that having your own wallet is “entirely up to you! You can certainly keep cryptocurrency, or fiat, or both, on the app.” Doesn't sound like much was learned here, which is really sad to see.
It's not that complicated or unreasonable to set up a proper hardware wallet. Multi-sig can be learned in a single course. Something the equivalent complexity of a driver's license test could prevent all the cold storage exploits we've seen to date - even globally. Platform operators have a key advantage in detecting and preventing fraud - they know their customers far better than any custodian ever would. The best job that custodians can do is to find high integrity individuals and train them to form even better wallet signatories. Rather than mandating that all platforms expose themselves to arbitrary third party risks, regulations should center around ensuring that all signatories are background-checked, properly trained, and using proper procedures. We also need to make sure that signatories are empowered with rights and responsibilities to reject and report fraud. They need to know that they can safely challenge and delay a transaction - even if it turns out they made a mistake. We need to have an environment where mistakes are brought to the surface and dealt with. Not one where firms and people feel the need to hide what happened. In addition to a knowledge-based test, an auditor can privately interview each signatory to make sure they're not in coercive situations, and we should make sure they can freely and anonymously report any issues without threat of retaliation.
A proper multi-sig has each signature held by a separate person and is governed by policies and mutual decisions instead of a hierarchy. It includes at least one redundant signature. For best results, 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.

History has demonstrated over and over again the risk of hot wallets even to highly credible organizations. Nonetheless, many platforms have hot wallets for convenience. While such losses are generally compensated by platforms without issue (for example Poloniex, Bitstamp, Bitfinex, Gatecoin, Coincheck, Bithumb, Zaif, CoinBene, Binance, Bitrue, Bitpoint, Upbit, VinDAX, and now KuCoin), the public tends to focus more on cases that didn't end well. Regardless of what systems are employed, there is always some level of risk. For that reason, most members of the public would prefer to see third party insurance.
Rather than trying to convince third party profit-seekers to provide comprehensive insurance and then relying on an expensive and slow legal system to enforce against whatever legal loopholes they manage to find each and every time something goes wrong, insurance could be run through multiple exchange operators and regulators, with the shared interest of having a reputable industry, keeping costs down, and taking care of Canadians. For example, a 4 of 7 multi-sig insurance fund held between 5 independent exchange operators and 2 regulatory bodies. All Canadian exchanges could pay premiums at a set rate based on their needed coverage, with a higher price paid for hot wallet coverage (anything not an air-gapped multi-sig cold wallet). Such a model would be much cheaper to manage, offer better coverage, and be much more reliable to payout when needed. The kind of coverage you could have under this model is unheard of. You could even create something like the CDIC to protect Canadians who get their trading accounts hacked if they can sufficiently prove the loss is legitimate. In cases of fraud, gross negligence, or insolvency, the fund can be used to pay affected users directly (utilizing the last transparent balance report in the worst case), something which private insurance would never touch. While it's recommended to have official policies for coverage, a model where members vote would fully cover edge cases. (Could be similar to the Supreme Court where justices vote based on case law.)
Such a model could fully protect all Canadians across all platforms. You can have a fiat coverage governed by legal agreements, and crypto-asset coverage governed by both multi-sig and legal agreements. It could be practical, affordable, and inclusive.

Now, we are at a crossroads. We can happily give up our freedom, our innovation, and our money. We can pay hefty expenses to auditors, lawyers, and regulators year after year (and make no mistake - this cost will grow to many millions or even billions as the industry grows - and it will be borne by all Canadians on every platform because platforms are not going to eat up these costs at a loss). We can make it nearly impossible for any new platform to enter the marketplace, forcing Canadians to use the same stagnant platforms year after year. We can centralize and consolidate the entire industry into 2 or 3 big players and have everyone else fail (possibly to heavy losses of users of those platforms). And when a flawed security model doesn't work and gets breached, we can make it even more complicated with even more people in suits making big money doing the job that blockchain was supposed to do in the first place. We can build a system which is so intertwined and dependent on big government, traditional finance, and central bankers that it's future depends entirely on that of the fiat system, of fractional banking, and of government bail-outs. If we choose this path, as history has shown us over and over again, we can not go back, save for revolution. Our children and grandchildren will still be paying the consequences of what we decided today.
Or, we can find solutions that work. We can maintain an open and innovative environment while making the adjustments we need to make to fully protect Canadian investors and cryptocurrency users, giving easy and affordable access to cryptocurrency for all Canadians on the platform of their choice, and creating an environment in which entrepreneurs and problem solvers can bring those solutions forward easily. None of the above precludes innovation in any way, or adds any unreasonable cost - and these three policies would demonstrably eliminate or resolve all 109 historic cases as studied here - that's every single case researched so far going back to 2011. It includes every loss that was studied so far not just in Canada but globally as well.
Unfortunately, finding answers is the least challenging part. Far more challenging is to get platform operators and regulators to agree on anything. My last post got no response whatsoever, and while the OSC has told me they're happy for industry feedback, I believe my opinion alone is fairly meaningless. This takes the whole community working together to solve. So please let me know your thoughts. Please take the time to upvote and share this with people. Please - let's get this solved and not leave it up to other people to do.

Facts/background/sources (skip if you like):



Thoughts?
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

ETHE & GBTC (Grayscale) Frequently Asked Questions

It is no doubt Grayscale’s booming popularity as a mainstream investment has caused a lot of community hullabaloo lately. As such, I felt it was worth making a FAQ regarding the topic. I’m looking to update this as needed and of course am open to suggestions / adding any questions.
The goal is simply to have a thread we can link to anyone with questions on Grayscale and its products. Instead of explaining the same thing 3 times a day, shoot those posters over to this thread. My hope is that these questions are answered in a fairly simple and easy to understand manner. I think as the sub grows it will be a nice reference point for newcomers.
Disclaimer: I do NOT work for Grayscale and as such am basing all these answers on information that can be found on their website / reports. (Grayscale’s official FAQ can be found here). I also do NOT have a finance degree, I do NOT have a Series 6 / 7 / 140-whatever, and I do NOT work with investment products for my day job. I have an accounting background and work within the finance world so I have the general ‘business’ knowledge to put it all together, but this is all info determined in my best faith effort as a layman. The point being is this --- it is possible I may explain something wrong or missed the technical terms, and if that occurs I am more than happy to update anything that can be proven incorrect
Everything below will be in reference to ETHE but will apply to GBTC as well. If those two segregate in any way, I will note that accordingly.
What is Grayscale? 
Grayscale is the company that created the ETHE product. Their website is https://grayscale.co/
What is ETHE? 
ETHE is essentially a stock that intends to loosely track the price of ETH. It does so by having each ETHE be backed by a specific amount of ETH that is held on chain. Initially, the newly minted ETHE can only be purchased by institutions and accredited investors directly from Grayscale. Once a year has passed (6 months for GBTC) it can then be listed on the OTCQX Best Market exchange for secondary trading. Once listed on OTCQX, anyone investor can purchase at this point. Additional information on ETHE can be found here.
So ETHE is an ETF? 
No. For technical reasons beyond my personal understandings it is not labeled an ETF. I know it all flows back to the “Securities Act Rule 144”, but due to my limited knowledge on SEC regulations I don’t want to misspeak past that. If anyone is more knowledgeable on the subject I am happy to input their answer here.
How long has ETHE existed? 
ETHE was formed 12/14/2017. GBTC was formed 9/25/2013.
How is ETHE created? 
The trust will issue shares to “Authorized Participants” in groups of 100 shares (called baskets). Authorized Participants are the only persons that may place orders to create these baskets and they do it on behalf of the investor.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 39 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Note – The way their reports word this makes it sound like there is an army of authorizers doing the dirty work, but in reality there is only one Authorized Participant. At this moment the “Genesis” company is the sole Authorized Participant. Genesis is owned by the “Digital Currency Group, Inc.” which is the parent company of Grayscale as well. (And to really go down the rabbit hole it looks like DCG is the parent company of CoinDesk and is “backing 150+ companies across 30 countries, including Coinbase, Ripple, and Chainalysis.”)
Source: Digital Currency Group, Inc. informational section on page 77 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
Source: Barry E. Silbert informational section on page 75 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
How does Grayscale acquire the ETH to collateralize the ETHE product? 
An Investor may acquire ETHE by paying in cash or exchanging ETH already owned.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 40 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Where does Grayscale store their ETH? Does it have a specific wallet address we can follow? 
ETH is stored with Coinbase Custody Trust Company, LLC. I am unaware of any specific address or set of addresses that can be used to verify the ETH is actually there.
As an aside - I would actually love to see if anyone knows more about this as it’s something that’s sort of peaked my interest after being asked about it… I find it doubtful we can find that however.
Source: Part C. Business Information, Item 8, subsection A. on page 16 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Can ETHE be redeemed for ETH? 
No, currently there is no way to give your shares of ETHE back to Grayscale to receive ETH back. The only method of getting back into ETH would be to sell your ETHE to someone else and then use those proceeds to buy ETH yourself.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Why are they not redeeming shares? 
I think the report summarizes it best:
Redemptions of Shares are currently not permitted and the Trust is unable to redeem Shares. Subject to receipt of regulatory approval from the SEC and approval by the Sponsor in its sole discretion, the Trust may in the future operate a redemption program. Because the Trust does not believe that the SEC would, at this time, entertain an application for the waiver of rules needed in order to operate an ongoing redemption program, the Trust currently has no intention of seeking regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the fee structure? 
ETHE has an annual fee of 2.5%. GBTC has an annual fee of 2.0%. Fees are paid by selling the underlying ETH / BTC collateralizing the asset.
Source: ETHE’s informational page on Grayscale’s website - Located Here
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 & 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the ratio of ETH to ETHE? 
At the time of posting (6/19/2020) each ETHE share is backed by .09391605 ETH. Each share of GBTC is backed by .00096038 BTC.
ETHE & GBTC’s specific information page on Grayscale’s website updates the ratio daily – Located Here
For a full historical look at this ratio, it can be found on the Grayscale home page on the upper right side if you go to Tax Documents > 2019 Tax Documents > Grayscale Ethereum Trust 2019 Tax Letter.
Why is the ratio not 1:1? Why is it always decreasing? 
While I cannot say for certain why the initial distribution was not a 1:1 backing, it is more than likely to keep the price down and allow more investors a chance to purchase ETHE / GBTC.
As noted above, fees are paid by selling off the ETH collateralizing ETHE. So this number will always be trending downward as time goes on.
Source: Description of Trust on page 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
I keep hearing about how this is locked supply… explain? 
As noted above, there is currently no redemption program for converting your ETHE back into ETH. This means that once an ETHE is issued, it will remain in circulation until a redemption program is formed --- something that doesn’t seem to be too urgent for the SEC or Grayscale at the moment. Tiny amounts will naturally be removed due to fees, but the bulk of the asset is in there for good.
Knowing that ETHE cannot be taken back and destroyed at this time, the ETH collateralizing it will not be removed from the wallet for the foreseeable future. While it is not fully locked in the sense of say a totally lost key, it is not coming out any time soon.
Per their annual statement:
The Trust’s ETH will be transferred out of the ETH Account only in the following circumstances: (i) transferred to pay the Sponsor’s Fee or any Additional Trust Expenses, (ii) distributed in connection with the redemption of Baskets (subject to the Trust’s obtaining regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program and the consent of the Sponsor), (iii) sold on an as-needed basis to pay Additional Trust Expenses or (iv) sold on behalf of the Trust in the event the Trust terminates and liquidates its assets or as otherwise required by law or regulation.
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Grayscale now owns a huge chunk of both ETH and BTC’s supply… should we be worried about manipulation, a sell off to crash the market crash, a staking cartel? 
First, it’s important to remember Grayscale is a lot more akin to an exchange then say an investment firm. Grayscale is working on behalf of its investors to create this product for investor control. Grayscale doesn’t ‘control’ the ETH it holds any more then Coinbase ‘controls’ the ETH in its hot wallet. (Note: There are likely some varying levels of control, but specific to this topic Grayscale cannot simply sell [legally, at least] the ETH by their own decision in the same manner Coinbase wouldn't be able to either.)
That said, there shouldn’t be any worry in the short to medium time-frame. As noted above, Grayscale can’t really remove ETH other than for fees or termination of the product. At 2.5% a year, fees are noise in terms of volume. Grayscale seems to be the fastest growing product in the crypto space at the moment and termination of the product seems unlikely.
IF redemptions were to happen tomorrow, it’s extremely unlikely we would see a mass exodus out of the product to redeem for ETH. And even if there was incentive to get back to ETH, the premium makes it so that it would be much more cost effective to just sell your ETHE on the secondary market and buy ETH yourself. Remember, any redemption is up to the investors and NOT something Grayscale has direct control over.
Yes, but what about [insert criminal act here]… 
Alright, yes. Technically nothing is stopping Grayscale from selling all the ETH / BTC and running off to the Bahamas (Hawaii?). BUT there is no real reason for them to do so. Barry is an extremely public figure and it won’t be easy for him to get away with that. Grayscale’s Bitcoin Trust creates SEC reports weekly / bi-weekly and I’m sure given the sentiment towards crypto is being watched carefully. Plus, Grayscale is making tons of consistent revenue and thus has little to no incentive to give that up for a quick buck.
That’s a lot of ‘happy little feels’ Bob, is there even an independent audit or is this Tether 2.0? 
Actually yes, an independent auditor report can be found in their annual reports. It is clearly aimed more towards the financial side and I doubt the auditors are crypto savants, but it is at least one extra set of eyes. Auditors are Friedman LLP – Auditor since 2015.
Source: Independent Auditor Report starting on page 116 (of the PDF itself) of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
As mentioned by user TheCrpytosAndBloods (In Comments Below), a fun fact:
The company’s auditors Friedman LLP were also coincidentally TetheBitfinex’s auditors until They controversially parted ways in 2018 when the Tether controversy was at its height. I am not suggesting for one moment that there is anything shady about DCG - I just find it interesting it’s the same auditor.
“Grayscale sounds kind of lame” / “Not your keys not your crypto!” / “Why is anyone buying this, it sounds like a scam?” 
Welp, for starters this honestly is not really a product aimed at the people likely to be reading this post. To each their own, but do remember just because something provides no value to you doesn’t mean it can’t provide value to someone else. That said some of the advertised benefits are as follows:
So for example, I can set up an IRA at a brokerage account that has $0 trading fees. Then I can trade GBTC and ETHE all day without having to worry about tracking my taxes. All with the relative safety something like E-Trade provides over Binance.
As for how it benefits the everyday ETH holder? I think the supply lock is a positive. I also think this product exposes the Ethereum ecosystem to people who otherwise wouldn’t know about it.
Why is there a premium? Why is ETHE’s premium so insanely high compared to GBTC’s premium? 
There are a handful of theories of why a premium exists at all, some even mentioned in the annual report. The short list is as follows:
Why is ETHE’s so much higher the GBTC’s? Again, a few thoughts:

Are there any other differences between ETHE and GBTC? 
I touched on a few of the smaller differences, but one of the more interesting changes is GBTC is now a “SEC reporting company” as of January 2020. Which again goes beyond my scope of knowledge so I won’t comment on it too much… but the net result is GBTC is now putting out weekly / bi-weekly 8-K’s and annual 10-K’s. This means you can track GBTC that much easier at the moment as well as there is an extra layer of validity to the product IMO.
I’m looking for some statistics on ETHE… such as who is buying, how much is bought, etc? 
There is a great Q1 2020 report I recommend you give a read that has a lot of cool graphs and data on the product. It’s a little GBTC centric, but there is some ETHE data as well. It can be found here hidden within the 8-K filings.Q1 2020 is the 4/16/2020 8-K filing.
For those more into a GAAP style report see the 2019 annual 10-K of the same location.
Is Grayscale only just for BTC and ETH? 
No, there are other products as well. In terms of a secondary market product, ETCG is the Ethereum Classic version of ETHE. Fun Fact – ETCG was actually put out to the secondary market first. It also has a 3% fee tied to it where 1% of it goes to some type of ETC development fund.
In terms of institutional and accredited investors, there are a few ‘fan favorites’ such as Bitcoin Cash, Litcoin, Stellar, XRP, and Zcash. Something called Horizion (Backed by ZEN I guess? Idk to be honest what that is…). And a diversified Mutual Fund type fund that has a little bit of all of those. None of these products are available on the secondary market.
Are there alternatives to Grayscale? 
I know they exist, but I don’t follow them. I’ll leave this as a “to be edited” section and will add as others comment on what they know.
Per user Over-analyser (in comments below):
Coinshares (Formerly XBT provider) are the only similar product I know of. BTC, ETH, XRP and LTC as Exchange Traded Notes (ETN).
It looks like they are fully backed with the underlying crypto (no premium).
https://coinshares.com/etps/xbt-provideinvestor-resources/daily-hedging-position
Denominated in SEK and EUR. Certainly available in some UK pensions (SIPP).
As asked by pegcity - Okay so I was under the impression you can just give them your own ETH and get ETHE, but do you get 11 ETHE per ETH or do you get the market value of ETH in USD worth of ETHE? 
I have always understood that the ETHE issued directly through Grayscale is issued without the premium. As in, if I were to trade 1 ETH for ETHE I would get 11, not say only 2 or 3 because the secondary market premium is so high. And if I were paying cash only I would be paying the price to buy 1 ETH to get my 11 ETHE. Per page 39 of their annual statement, it reads as follows:
The Trust will issue Shares to Authorized Participants from time to time, but only in one or more Baskets (with a Basket being a block of 100 Shares). The Trust will not issue fractions of a Basket. The creation (and, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redemption) of Baskets will be made only in exchange for the delivery to the Trust, or the distribution by the Trust, of the number of whole and fractional ETH represented by each Basket being created (or, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redeemed), which is determined by dividing (x) the number of ETH owned by the Trust at 4:00 p.m., New York time, on the trade date of a creation or redemption order, after deducting the number of ETH representing the U.S. dollar value of accrued but unpaid fees and expenses of the Trust (converted using the ETH Index Price at such time, and carried to the eighth decimal place), by (y) the number of Shares outstanding at such time (with the quotient so obtained calculated to one one-hundred-millionth of one ETH (i.e., carried to the eighth decimal place)), and multiplying such quotient by 100 (the “Basket ETH Amount”). All questions as to the calculation of the Basket ETH Amount will be conclusively determined by the Sponsor and will be final and binding on all persons interested in the Trust. The Basket ETH Amount multiplied by the number of Baskets being created or redeemed is the “Total Basket ETH Amount.” The number of ETH represented by a Share will gradually decrease over time as the Trust’s ETH are used to pay the Trust’s expenses. Each Share represented approximately 0.0950 ETH and 0.0974 ETH as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

submitted by Bob-Rossi to ethfinance [link] [comments]

Full Option Koinpro

In today's world of heavily nascent and volatile cryptocurrency, one point or factor stands out. That is exchanges. Cryptocurrency exchanges are sites(whether physical or virtual) where cryptocurrencies are traded for each other or traditional fiat currencies like Euro, Pound Sterling or US Dollar. They may be divided by many criteria, chief of which may be Modus Operandi or Central Control. The Degree of Control suggests a central control of exchange management and resources. There are Centralized, Decentralized and Hybrid exchanges. Now we can narrow down to Centralized Exchanges. These are where transactions are monitored and controlled by the owners of the exchange. Transactions can be made only through mechanisms provided and approved by the central body. Also there is no access to private keys by traders. Examples include Koinpro, Binance, Kucoin, Bittrex etc.
About Koinpro This is a Smart Bitcoin Futures Exchange. KoinPro, your new fangled crypto exchange, that goes beyond crypto and boasts of multiple futures contracts, with its own unique features and benefits. Bitcoin Futures, Contracts for Difference are complex instruments. Trading these financial products carries a high level of risk since leverage can work both to your advantage and disadvantage. There are a lot of exchanges, both crypto and fiat(mainstream and otherwise) trading tools like CFD, oil, futures etc; but not one of them Integrates CFDs like Koinpro. Its a no-brainer choice, since going for KoinPro’s unique double-UP contract, customers can simply enter into a predefined order position that will automatically terminate when the position either gains or loses 100% of its value, or when the contract expires — whichever comes first. insurance coverage is provided as a courtesy to BitGo Prime, which is a sole counterparty Prices derived from a wide range of Tier 1 institutions such as exchanges and professional market makers Trading on a fully non-disclosed basis Fully integrated with BitGo Portfolio & Tax. At KoinPro, we take the safety and security of our clients extremely seriously. To help make KoinPro one of the safest places to trade, we store our customer funds in cold storage wallets provided by BitGo—the world leader in secure digital asset storage. BitGo custody includes a $100 million insurance plan underwritten by Lloyd’s of London—one of the UK’s largest insurance markets.
This insurance coverage is provided as a courtesy to KoinPro users and hence comes at no additional cost. This insurance coverage protects digital assets held by BitGo, Inc. or BitGo Trust Company in the event of;
Third-party hacks or theft of private keys Insider theft by employees of private keys Physical loss or damage of private keys
BitGo has delivered institution-grade security for digital assets since 2013, and features state-of-the-art cold storage technology, which includes a bank-grade Class III vault and stringent controls designed to practically eliminate the risk of loss. Full details about the BitGo custody and insurance protection can be found here.
https://koinpro.com/
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5219842
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Playing with fire with FinCen and SEC, Binance may face a hefty penalty again after already losing 50 percent of its trading business

On 14 June, Binance announced that it “constantly reviews user accounts to improve (their) platform security and to comply with global compliance requirements”, mentioning that “Binance is unable to provide services to any U.S. person” in the latest “Binance Terms of Use” attached within the announcement.
According to the data from a third-party traffic statistics website, Alexa, users in the U.S. form the biggest user group of Binance, accounting for about 25% of the total visitor traffic.
In the forecast of Binance’s user scale compiled by The Block, the largest traffic is dominated by users in the U.S., surpassing the total of the ones from the second place to the fifth place.
Also, considering that the scale of digital asset trading for the users in the U.S. far exceeds that of the users of many other countries, it could mean that Binance may have already lost 50 % of the business income by losing users in the U.S. Apparently, such an announcement by Binance to stop providing services to users in the U.S. means Binance has no other alternative but “seek to live on.”
So, what are the specific requirements of the U.S. for digital asset exchanges and which of the regulatory red lines of the U.S. did Binance cross?
Compliance issues relating to operation permission of digital asset exchanges
In the U.S., the entry barrier for obtaining a business license to operate a digital asset exchange is not high. Apart from the special licencing requirements of individual states such as New York, most of the states generally grant licences to digital asset exchanges through the issuance of a “Money Transmitter License” (MTL).
Each state has different requirements for MTL applications. Some of the main common requirements are:
Filling out the application form, including business address, tax identification number, social security number and statement of net assets of the owneproprietor Paying the relevant fees for the licence application Meeting the minimum net assets requirements stipulated by the state Completing a background check Providing a form of guarantee, such as security bonds
It is worth noting that not all states are explicitly using MTL to handle the issues around operation permission of digital asset exchanges. For instance, New Hampshire passed a new law on 12 March 2017, announcing that trading parties of digital assets in that state would not be bound by MTL. Also, Montana has not yet set up MTL, keeping an open attitude towards the currency trading business.
On top of obtaining the MTL in each state, enterprises are also required to complete the registration of “Money Services Business” (MSB) on the federal level FinCEN (Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the U.S. Treasury Department) issued the “Application of FinCEN’s Regulations to Persons Administering, Exchanging, or Using Virtual Currencies” on 18 March 2013. On the federal level, the guideline requires any enterprise involved in virtual currency services to complete the MSB registration and perform the corresponding compliance responsibilities. The main responsibility of a registered enterprise is to establish anti-money laundering procedures and reporting systems.
However, California is an exception. Enterprises in California would only need to complete the MSB registration on the federal level and they do not need to apply for the MTL in California.
Any enterprise operating in New York must obtain a virtual currency business license, Bitlicense, issued in New York
Early in July 2014, the New York State Department of Financial Services (NYSDFS) has specially designed and launched the BitLicense, stipulating that any institutions participating in a business relevant to virtual currency (virtual currency transfer, virtual currency trust, provision of virtual currency trading services, issuance or management of virtual currencies) must obtain a BitLicense.
To date, the NYSDFS has issued 19 Bitlicenses. Among them includes exchanges such as Coinbase (January 2017), BitFlyer (July 2017), Genesis Global Trading (May 2018) and Bitstamp (April 2019).
Solely from the perspective of operation permission, Binance has yet to complete the MSB registration of FinCEN (its partner, BAM Trading, has completed the MSB registration). This means that Binance is not eligible to operate a digital asset exchange in the U.S. FinCEN has the rights to prosecute Binance based on its failure to fulfil the relevant ‘anti-money laundering’ regulatory requirements.
Compliance issues relating to online assets
With the further development of the digital asset market, ICO has released loads of “digital assets” that have characteristics of a “security” into the trading markets. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has proposed more comprehensive compliance requirements for digital asset exchanges. The core of the requirements is reflected in the restrictions of offering digital assets trading service.
In the last two years, the SEC has reiterated on many occasions that digital assets that have characteristics of a security should not be traded on a digital asset exchange
In August 2017, when the development of ICO was at its peak, the SEC issued an investor bulletin “Investor Bulletin: Initial Coin Offerings” on its website and published an investigation report of the DAO. It determined that the DAO tokens were considered ‘marketable securities’, stressing that all digital assets considered ‘marketable securities’ would be incorporated into the SEC regulatory system, bound by the U.S. federal securities law. Soon after, the SEC also declared and stressed that “(if) a platform offers trading of digital assets that are securities and operates as an “exchange,” as defined by the federal securities laws, then the platform must register with the SEC as a national securities exchange or be exempt from registration.”
On 16 November 2018, the SEC issued a “Statement on Digital Asset Securities Issuance and Trading,” in which the SEC used five real case studies to conduct exemplary penalty rulings on the initial offers and sales of digital asset securities, including those issued in ICOs, relevant cryptocurrency exchanges, investment management tools, ICO platforms and so on. The statement further reiterates that exchanges cannot provide trading services for digital assets that have characteristics of a security.
On 3 April 2019, the SEC issued the “Framework for ‘Investment Contract’ Analysis of Digital Assets” to further elucidate the evaluation criteria for determining whether a digital asset is a security and providing guiding opinions on the compliance of the issuance, sales, holding procedures of digital assets.
As of now, only a small number of digital assets, such as BTC, ETH, etc. meet the SEC’s requirement of “non-securities assets.” The potentially “compliant” digital assets are less than 20.
Early in March 2014, the Inland Revenue Service (IRS) has stated that Bitcoin will be treated as a legal property and will be subject to taxes. In September 2015, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) stated that Bitcoin is a commodity and will be treated as a “property” by the IRS for tax purposes.
On 15 June 2018, William Hinman, Director of the Corporate Finance Division of the SEC, said at the Cryptocurrency Summit held in San Francisco that BTC and ETH are not securities. Nevertheless, many ICO tokens fall under the securities category.
So far, only BTC and ETH have received approval and recognition of the U.S. regulatory authority as a “non-securities asset.”
Since July 2018, the SEC has investigated more than ten types of digital assets, one after another, and ruled that they were securities and had to be incorporated into the SEC regulatory system. It prosecuted and punished those who had contravened the issuance and trading requirements of the securities laws.
Although there are still many digital assets that have yet to be characterised as “securities”, it is extremely difficult to be characterised as a “non-securities asset” based on the evaluation criteria announced by the SEC. As the SEC’s spokesperson has reiterated many times, they believe the majority of ICO tokens are securities.
Under the stipulated requirements of the SEC, Coinbase, a leading U.S. exchange, has withdrawn a batch of digital assets. The assets withdrawn included digital assets that had been characterised as “securities” as well as those that have high risks of being characterised as “securities.” However, it is worth noting that although the risk to be characterised as “securities” for more than ten types of digital assets, which have not been explicitly required by SEC to be withdrawn, is relatively small, they are not entirely safe. With the further escalation of the SEC’s investigations, they could still be characterised as securities and be held accountable for violating their responsibilities. However, this requires further guidance from the SEC.
*Coinbase’s 14 types of digital assets that have yet to be requested for withdrawal
Poloniex announced on 16 May that it would stop providing services for nine digital assets, including Ardor (ARDR), Bytecoin (BCN), etc. under the compliance guidelines of the SEC. On 7 June, Bittrex also announced that it would stop providing trading services to U.S. users for 32 digital assets. The action of the SEC on its regulatory guidance was further reinforced apparently.
In fact, it is not the first time that these two exchanges have withdrawn digital assets under regulatory requirements. Since the rapid development of digital assets driven by ICO in 2017, Poloniex and Bittrex were once leading exchanges for ICO tokens, providing comprehensive trading services for digital assets. However, after the SEC reiterated its compliance requirements, Poloniex and Bittrex have withdrawn a considerable amount of assets in the past year to meet the compliance requirements.
In conclusion, the takeaways that we have got are as follows: Under the existing U.S. regulatory requirements of digital assets, after obtaining the basic entry licences (MSB, MTL), exchanges could either choose the “compliant asset” solution of Coinbase and only list a small number of digital assets that do not have apparent characteristics of a security, and at all times prepare to withdraw any asset later characterised as “securities” by the SECs; or choose to be like OKEx and Huobi and make it clear they would “not provide services to any U.S. users” at the start.
Binance has been providing a large number of digital assets that have characteristics of a security to U.S users without a U.S. securities exchange licence, so it has already contravened the SEC regulatory requirements.
On top of that, it is also worth noting that the rapid development of Binance has been achieved precisely through the behaviours of “contrary to regulations” and “committing crimes.” Amid the blocking of several pioneering exchanges, such as OKCoin, Huobi, etc. providing services to Chinese users in the Chinese market under new laws from the regulatory authorities, Binance leapfrogged the competition and began to dominate the Chinese market. Similarly, Binance’s rapid growth in the U.S. market is mainly due to its domination of the traffic of digital assets withdrawn by Poloniex and Bittrex. One can say that Binance not only has weak awareness of compliance issues, but it is also indeed “playing with fire” with the U.S. regulators.
In April 2018, the New York State Office of Attorney General (OAG) requested 13 digital asset exchanges, including Binance, to prepare for investigations, indicating it would initiate an investigation in relations to company ownership, leadership, operating conditions, service terms, trading volume, relationships with financial institutions, etc. Many exchanges, including Gemini, Bittrex, Poloniex, BitFlyer, Bitfinex, and so on, proactively acknowledged and replied in the first instance upon receipt of the investigation notice. However, Binance had hardly any action.
Binance has been illegally operating in the U.S. for almost two years. It has not yet fulfilled the FinCEN and MSB registration requirements. Moreover, it has also neglected the SEC announcements and OAG investigation summons on several occasions. The ultimate announcement of exiting the U.S. market may be due to the tremendous pressure imposed by the U.S. regulators.
In fact, the SEC executives have recently stressed that “exchanges of IEO in the U.S. market are facing legal risks and the SEC would soon crack down on these illegal activities” on numerous occasions. These were clear indications of imposing pressure on Binance.
Regarding the SEC’s rulings on illegal digital asset exchanges, EtherDelta and investment management platform, Crypto Asset Management, it may not be easy for Binance to “fully exit” from the U.S. market. It may be faced with a hefty penalty. Once there are any compensation claims by the U.S. users for losses incurred in the trading of assets at Binance, it would be dragged into a difficult compensation dilemma. It would undoubtedly be a double blow for Binance that has just been held accountable for the losses incurred in a theft of 7,000 BTC.
Coincidentally, Binance was tossed out of Japan because of compliance issues. In March 2018, the Financial Services Agency of Japan officially issued a stern warning to Binance, which was boldly providing services to Japanese users without registering for a digital asset exchange licence in Japan. Binance was forced to relocate to Malta instead. Binance may have to bear hefty penalties arising from challenging the compliance requirements after it had lost important markets due to consecutive compliance issues.
The rise of Binance was attributed to its bold and valiant style, grasping the opportunity created in the vacuum period of government regulation, breaking compliance requirements and rapidly dominating the market to obtain user traffic. For a while, it gained considerable advantages in the early, barbaric growth stage of the industry. Nonetheless, under the increasingly comprehensive regulatory compliance system for global digital asset markets, Binance, which has constantly been “evading regulation” and “resisting supervision” would undoubtedly face enormous survival challenges, notwithstanding that it would lose far more than 50 per cent of the market share.
https://www.asiacryptotoday.com/playing-with-fire-with-fincen-and-sec-binance-may-face-a-hefty-penalty-again-after-already-losing-50-percent-of-its-trading-business/
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BitcoinTaxes Podcast: Crypto Audits w/ Alex Kugelman

BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link
TLDR; Alex Kugelman, a tax controversy lawer, discusses crypto audits and how to avoid them.
Highlights:
IRS audits are a real possibility for anyone who has traded cryptocurrencies. Our guest today is Alex Kugelman, a tax controversy lawyer with an abundance of knowledge concerning cryptocurrency audits. He's here to share his expertise on IRS cryptocurrency audits, including risk reduction strategies as well as enforcement predictions and misconceptions.
Alex Kugelman specializes in IRS audits. His experience includes four years of Federal government court experience at the U.S. Tax Court and a U.S. District Court. [00:40]
Alex: I'm an attorney out in California. I clerked for a US District Court judge and as well as the United States Tax Court. I've been in private practice exclusively doing tax controversy work for the past five years or so. I kind of got involved with crypto towards the end of 2016. I tended to represent clients mainly with compliance & disclosure issues with respect to cryptocurrency. I just really like it. Really interesting area.
The Coinbase summons in 2018 played a major role in Alex's interest in crypto audits. [01:19]
Alex: What started me into the crypto space was when the IRS first issued summons for Coinbase. We started getting some interesting calls regarding that. And at that time I thought to myself, this might be an interesting area. So I started following the actual summons enforcement proceeding at the District Court here in San Francisco - from there kind of worked with people under different types of compliance, including international disclosures. Now we're starting to see some of the first cryptocurrency audits come through.
First, let's get a brief rundown of how IRS audits work. [02:00]
Alex: It is important to understand the IRS as an administrative agency and all different layers of it. So when it comes to an audit the term that the IRS uses is an examination and there's three basic levels.
The first is a correspondence exam. That's where you get a letter that says, dear taxpayer, so-and-so reported that you had $100 of interest income that wasn't on your tax return - we're going to increase your tax. If you want to challenge that, you can. And that's basically termed an under reporter notice. That's probably not going to be a cryptocurrency audit if you get that notice.
The next one is an office exam. That is someone in the local IRS office sending you a letter that says, we have selected a certain tax return for audit and we're going to look at these issues. We'd like you to call us to schedule an appointment. That's going to be usually a tax compliance officer that is doing that.
The third and probably the most serious level of exam is a field examination. That's also going to be a local IRS representative, typically a revenue agent. There, the revenue agent may come to your work or ask come to your work or business to kind of conduct the audit.
All three of those are going to start the same: a letter that's sent to you at your most recent address provided to the IRS.
Cryptocurrency audits follow a similar protocol. [05:40]
Alex: I think it's likely that most crypto audits are going to start with one of two things happening. One is that there is information from the Coinbase summons that is inconsistent with what was on a taxpayer's tax return. I think for someone who's involved with that issue, they're going to have a good sense of that one because they should've gotten an email notice from Coinbase.
Or two, the audit notice is going to identify older tax years - 2013, 2014 or 2015 because those are the years that the information related to.
Another reason I think people will get audited is going to be because information on the return is incomplete, in the sense that the taxpayer or the cryptocurrency owner reports some transactions, without enough detail to figure out the actual cost basis.
Does reporting your data in an aggregated fashion increase your chances of being audited? [06:45]
Alex: I mean one - to the extent that there's going to be a lot of taxpayers - a lot of people use TurboTax, right? If that's the way TurboTax is preparing all of those returns, it would seem to me you're kind of in a herd of people like that. And at least it's consistent with what a lot of people are doing. The second part of that is going to be at least those people who have prepare the returns in that manner, they're going to, or should have, the underlying data. So even if it's an aggregate reporting of each asset class as opposed to each individual trade, if there ever were questions then you're going to have your CSV files, you're going to have your Bitcoin.tax exports, you're going to have all the information that you need to back that up.
Alex is an advocate of over-reporting your information to the IRS. [09:30]
Alex: I'm a big proponent of over-reporting - and I don't mean paying too much tax. I just mean including too much information. Because at some point there's kind of two ways that your returned can be flagged: a computer flags the return for some reason or there's a special unit or a person who actually flags it. At the end of the day, a human being will be looking at that return and deciding whether it actually is going to go all the way through to an audit. I want them to completely understand what's being reported, why it's been reported, and if there's too much information, that's fine - it's less likely that someone's going to have more questions.
A crypto audit is very likely to be a field exam - and it's important to hire a good rep. [11:00]
Alex: It's very likely going to be a field exam, which means you're going to have a revenue agent - and those are kind of the best of the best auditors for an IRS audit. And remember - an IRS audit is a civil matter. It is not criminal at this point. Again, it's unlikely that it will become criminal. It is, however, the highest level of audit you're going to get.
If you're going to hire a representative, which you have every right to do, you should contact that person, let them know what's going on and probably have them interface with the auditor. You should receive, as part of the opening notice or letter, the information document request - which is identifying what things to bring for the auditor. Also, it'll tip to what topics might be important. For example the typical things you're going to see will be bank statements, financial or asset account statements, which I view as requesting exchange statements or exchange CSV files. Any documents that show the cost basis for your cryptocurrency trades.
Audits are more art than science. [13:35]
Alex: The auditor has a fair amount of power. So if you play real hardball - that's not going to prevent the auditor from expanding to other years. So when you get that audit notice ,and let's say that you're going to deal with this yourself, the first thing you want to kind of figure out is what are the areas that I wouldn't want to go into, and what are the areas that I don't have good records? That will help guide the way to respond or what information to pull together.
The reality is, and let's just be honest here - for most people reporting cryptocurrency gains, they have all of the information. The IRS does not have much. They might have some records from Coinbase, but it's not as if they have a treasure trove of third party data.
The burden is really going to be, in every audit, on the taxpayer to prove their tax return is correct.
It's difficult to say how lenient the IRS will be regarding past years. [15:35]
Alex: I think the way that I would look at it is that maybe the standard of of records required to really substantiate older years might be a little bit lower for older years as opposed to now because it's different now. There's a lot better information provided by some of the exchanges. There's a lot more software out there to help you, especially for people who are newer to crypto. You should have access to all your bank records. You should still have a lot of emails, reflecting on-ramping off-ramping, or other purchases. You should be able to kind of pull this all together.
I can understand when we have clients who come in and are early adopters and they're missing chunks of information. So I do think that in those types of circumstances, yes, I think there would be a little bit of leniency. But I don't think if you're asking, hey, I reported my gains in 2017 but I never really did it 14, 15 or 16 - I don't think that's going to be viewed very favorably.
It is possible to substantiate your data without all of your records. [19:00]
Alex: I think the first thing is, I mean, outside of cryptocurrency and just generally in audits, how many people have complete records to support everything on their tax return from three years ago? Right? It's just not the reality.
The best source of information in a lot of these cryptocurrency clients are the clients themselves. They kind of know what they did and they can remember. There's some who take good notes and other people don't, but as you go through and ask people: what exchanges have you've been on, what type of coins, if you bought any ICOs, have you ever sold for actual US cash, and have you ever bought goods or services? As you talk through things people tend to recall what happened. We use that information and we cross check that against bank statements, as well as CSV files, to pick out what those transactions look like.
Most people have some sort of records, at least reflecting the transfer in and the transfer back out of that exchange. So you can use historical data and historical pricing information to essentially estimate what that transaction would have been. And then what we do is we provide a written statement summary of what we're doing and why we're doing it.
The other big one that we see all the time - and anybody listening to this, please hear this, do not trade for your friends on your exchange accounts - because that type of commingling causes such major problems. Essentially you are walking into those taxable gains just because you're allowing someone access to the exchange to make sales.
If you need representation for an audit, get representation. [23:00]
Alex: My general rule is that I think experienced representatives are really important. I probably would not hire the CPA that prepared my return unless they were: one, experienced with being a representative in audits. And two, you felt comfortable that they weren't going to go in there with a conflict of interest. But I do think if you're worried about going into audit - hiring a skilled, and experienced rep is really, really important.
If they're experienced with this, they should understand the appropriate ethical standards and go in there and essentially help resolve portions of the audit and move it to a resolution that you can deal with.
Taxpayers actually have a lot of leverage in an audit. And that sounds crazy to say, but there is a lot of truth to that. And so as you're kind of working through the audit itself, you want to make sure that you're not just agreeing to something to be done with it. You're not agreeing to something just because you think that you'll get in more trouble or get a worse result otherwise.
There are important risk-reduction strategies you can utilize to avoid a crypto audit. [28:15]
Alex: The first thing that you really want to do, is just assess; for those of you that are really worried about an audit - just assess what it is you've actually done over the years. When did you start trading, what exchanges were you on, do you have records that reflect on-ramping and off-ramping? And that's going to be your bank account statements. Do you know where you've been, what exchanges you've been on?
For foreign exchanges, there may not be as much of that AML & KYC compliance, but I really believe that you do have reporting requirements under FATCA for FBAR and something called an 8938, which if you listen to the podcast with Tyson, he kind of explains what that is. But it's basically if you have ownership of a foreign bank account or asset, you have certain reporting requirements, whether you've had income or not.
You want to make sure you at least track when you've actually exchanged crypto for cash or vice versa. That's partly because that's one of those areas where when people can get in trouble with some sort of federal investigators - because those types of transactions can be potentially considered money laundering.
For those who believe that they've used like-kind exchange rules to defer taxable gains -you should look on your tax returns to see if you filed the form 8824, which is where like kind exchanges are actually reported. That kind of goes back to the over reporting issue I was talking about before. I think that if you didn't report the actual trades that you're taking like-kind treatment for in past years, I don't know that you've actually taken like-kind treatment to be frank with you. I think, objectively, that might be viewed as just not reporting certain transactions.
You want to make sure that you address these issues sooner rather than later.
1099-K forms can be misleading - to the recipient and, potentially, the auditor. [32:40]
Alex: A 1099-K is actually a merchant processing third party information returns. And it really is typically associated with people who have credit card sales - so it's going to reflect a gross amount and typically on a monthly basis.
It shows the gross amount and what I've seen too is that sometimes transfers actually get caught into that amount as well. So it's not even just gross sales or purchases - it may have other information. So the 1099-K can be really inflated. That's why reconciling that against accounting records is really, really important because that is one of those issues that I think could lead to an exam.
To those who think crypto isn't beholden to tax laws: you are not correct. [37:38]
Alex: The current commissioner of the IRS is Charles Rettig, and he's a really well known practitioner in tax controversy. I know from people that know him well, that he's actually mentioned Reddit as one of the reasons that cryptocurrency enforcement is his number one enforcement priority right now.
The other person that I've seen speak a couple of times is the head of the IRS Criminal Investigation Unit. His name is Don Fort and every year he does a presentation at the National Tax Controversy and Criminal Tax Conference. The last two years cryptocurrency has been number two and number one on his list. As much as the IRS lacks the funding and the manpower that it needs for all the enforcement, the IRS CI are really, really good and they are probably best agency at dealing with cryptocurrency enforcement issues.
I really think that it's gaining steam and I think once the audits from the Coinbase summons kind of get going, I think it's going to be a really scrutinized area. I think the people who have gone through the cost and the pain of disclosing and amending returns and doing everything they can will be happy that they did in a couple of years. I think the other people are going to be sweating it out - I don't know if it's ever really worth it to be honest with you. I would recommend people do their best to get in compliance.
In summary: do your best to report your crypto gains and losses - and don't try to pull one over on the IRS. [42:36]
Alex: For people who have potential issues with past years, one is getting a consistent record and just amending your past years, so they're consistent.
For people who have the foreign account issues - let's just say, for example, had an account with Binance, and that Binance account was never reported. The IRS has disclosure programs that allow you to amend certain returns, pay the tax that you report and pay a penalty, which would be 5% of the the highest account value that you have.
For people who don't want to deal with this, I think taking evasive steps is the best way to get the worst result possible. One of the things that I learned very early in dealing with audits and tax compliance, is that you can always make things worse. I think you really just want to address it and resolve the issue while you have a good opportunity.
We may see criminal prosecution of some of the "big fish" tax evaders from the Coinbase summons. [46:43]
Alex: Yeah, and I think the two things that I'm fairly certain we're going to see: one is we're going to see the IRS use the information provided by Coinbase to start auditing the biggest account holders from that period. I think that's very likely.
Probably the second one that I would say is very likely is that you're going to see limited criminal prosecutions related to cryptocurrency. And these are going to be people that have some sort of level of notoriety, whether actually famous or maybe famous in the cryptocurrency world. That's typically how the IRS and Department of Justice uses limited resources to prosecute criminal tax tax crimes.
Alex is a great guy to reach out to with any audit-related questions, crypto or otherwise. [48:50]
Alex: You can go to my website: www.kugelmanlaw.com. You can email me at [email protected]. I have clients all over the country, international clients. If you need any sort of help, whether that's representing you, or at least doing the nitty gritty audit investigation, we're always willing to talk to people and help them out as best we can.

If you enjoyed our podcast, be sure to check back frequently for more great discussions about a range of topics in the crypto space. If you have any questions for Alex Kugelman, or want to schedule a consultation with him, he can be reached via his website www.kugelmanlaw.com, or via email at [email protected].
If you would like to request a topic for an interview, or have any questions related to this podcast, be sure to reach out to us at [email protected].
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20190930(Market index 27 — Fear state)

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20190930(Market index 27 — Fear state)

https://preview.redd.it/cj3ysjyoirp31.png?width=405&format=png&auto=webp&s=87dc996d5fae2556bc5bd1c22c6a8cceba09e286

European Banking Giant Developing Blockchain Platform And Digital Currency Payments For Transit Riders In Madrid The Municipal Transport Company of Madrid (EMT) is planning to launch a blockchain-powered application that will allow users to pay with digital currency for the company’s train and bus services across the city. Vottun, the company behind the development of the App, is one of 300 firms that submitted an application to participate in the Madrid in Motion project, which involves adding support for a digital payment system to the city’s public transportation system. To develop the payment system, the startup is partnering with Banco Santander, the fifth-largest bank in Europe. Earlier this month, Banco Santander became the first financial institution to issue an end-to-end debt-based bond on Ethereum’s public blockchain.
IRS Releases ‘Tax Cheat’ Info Raising Concerns About Crypto Theft The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a new report and infographic on Sept 26 illustrating unpaid or underpaid taxes for the years 2011–2013. The numbers reflect estimates based on the last such findings, for the years 2008–2010. With commissioner Chuck Rettig citing the importance of voluntary compliance, and crypto’s popularity on the rise, the IRS is growing increasingly concerned with opportunities for tax evasion afforded by the new digital money.
Japanese Government To Hold Blockchain-Themed Symposium On October 7 The Research Institute of Economy, Trade, and Industry (RIETI) will hold a symposium named Next·Blockchain on October 7. This is reportedly the first time for the Japanese government to host such a blockchain-focused conference. Attendees include Chris Dai, the Long Hash CEO, Steven Pu, the Taraxa founder and CEO, Yuzo Kano, bitFlyer co-founder and CEO, etc.

Encrypted project calendar(September 30, 2019)

INS/Insolar: Insolar (INS) will be on September 30th ERD/Elrond: Elrond (ERD) will conduct main network test on September 30th NULS/NULS: The NULS team will plan to beta the ChainBOX in the third quarter. CS/Credits: Credits (CS) will exchange tokens and bug rewards in the third quarter QTUM/Qtum: Quantum Chain (QTUM) is expected to complete lightning network beta in the third quarter XEM/NEM: New World Bank (XEM) will release mobile wallet and computer wallet in the third quarter HC/HyperCash: hypercash (HC) will complete community management agreement in the third quarter

Encrypted project calendar(October 01, 2019)

HT/Huobi Token: The financial base public link jointly created by Firecoin and Nervos is expected to be open source in October. RVN/Ravencoin: Ravencoin (RVN) Ravencoin will perform a hard fork on October 1. SHND/StrongHands: StrongHands (SHND) SHND 1000: The 1st currency exchange event will be held on October 1. ADA/Cardano: Cardano (ADA) plans to hold technical consensus meeting in Amsterdam on October 1st XRC/Bitcoin Rhodium: Bitcoin Rhodium (XRC) will record account balance awards on October 1st PPC/Peercoin: Peercoin (PPC) will perform Peercoin v0.8 (code tang lang) hard fork on October 1st

Encrypted project calendar(October 02, 2019)

BNB/Binance Coin: The 2019 DELTA Summit will be held in Malta from October 2nd to 4th. The DELTA Summit is Malta’s official blockchain and digital innovation campaign. BTC/Bitcoin: The B.Tokyo 2019 conference will be held in Tokyo from October 2nd to 3rd. CAPP/Cappasity: The Cappasity (CAPP) London Science and Technology Festival will be held from October 2nd to 3rd, when the Cappasity project will be attended by the Science and Technology Festival.

Encrypted project calendar(October 03, 2019)

ETC/Ethereum Classic: The 2019 Ether Classic (ETC) Summit will be held in Vancouver on October 3–4 ANT/Aragon: Aragon (ANT) is the AGP for the new mandatory community review period, with a deadline of October 3.

Encrypted project calendar(October 04, 2019)

KNC/Kyber Network: Kyber Network (KNC) will update the maxGasPrice parameter in the Kyber Network contract from 100 gwei to 50 gwei within 2 weeks after October 4.

Encrypted project calendar(October 05, 2019)

Ontology (ONT): Ony Ji will attend the blockchain event in Japan on October 5th and explain the practical application based on the ontology network.

Encrypted project calendar(October 06, 2019)

SPND/ Spendcoin: Spendcoin (SPND) will be online on October 6th

Encrypted project calendar(October 07, 2019)

GNO/Gnosis: Gnosis (GNO) will discuss the topic “Decentralized Trading Agreement Based on Ethereum” will be held in Osaka, Japan on October 7th. Kyber and Uniswap, Gnosis and Loopring will attend and give speeches.

Encrypted project calendar(October 08, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2nd Global Digital Mining Summit will be held in Frankfurt, Germany from October 8th to 10th.

Encrypted project calendar(October 09, 2019)

CENNZ/Centrality: Centrality (CENNZ) will meet in InsurTechNZ Connect — Insurance and Blockchain on October 9th in Auckland.

Encrypted project calendar(October 10, 2019)

INB/Insight Chain: The Insight Chain (INB) INB public blockchain main network will be launched on October 10. VET/Vechain: VeChain (VET) will attend the BLOCKWALKS Blockchain Europe Conference on October 10. CAPP/Cappasity: Cappasity (CAPP) Cappasity will be present at the Osaka Global Innovation Forum in Osaka (October 10–11).

Encrypted project calendar(October 11, 2019)

OKB/OKB: OKB (OKB) OKEx series of talks will be held in Istanbul on October 11th to discuss “the rise of the Turkish blockchain.”

Encrypted project calendar(October 12, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2019 Global Mining Leaders Summit will be held in Chengdu, China from October 12th to 14th.

Encrypted project calendar(October 14, 2019)

BCH/Bitcoin Cash: The ChainPoint 19 conference will be held in Armenia from October 14th to 15th.

Encrypted project calendar(October 15, 2019)

RUFF/RUFF Token: Ruff will end the three-month early bird program on October 15th KAT/Kambria: Kambria (KAT) exchanges ERC20 KAT for a 10% bonus on BEP2 KAT-7BB, and the token exchange reward will end on October 15. BTC/Bitcoin: The Blockchain Technology Investment Summit (CIS) will be held in Los Angeles from October 15th to 16th.

Encrypted project calendar(October 16, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2019 Blockchain Life Summit will be held in Moscow, Russia from October 16th to 17th. MIOTA/IOTA: IOTA (MIOTA) IOTA will host a community event on the theme of “Technology Problem Solving and Testing IoT Devices” at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles on October 16. ETH/Ethereum: Ethereum launches Istanbul (Istanbul) main network upgrade, this main network upgrade involves 6 code upgrades. QTUM/Qtum: Qtum (QTUM) Qtum main network hard fork is scheduled for October 16.

Encrypted project calendar(October 18, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The SEC will give a pass on the VanEck/SolidX ETF on October 18th and make a final decision HB/HeartBout: HeartBout (HB) will officially release the Android version of the HeartBout app on October 18.

Recently, there was a minor upside correction in bitcoin above the $8,000 level against the US Dollar. The BTC/USD pair even climbed above the $8,200 resistance. Finally, the price spiked towards $8,400, but it failed to gain momentum. Moreover, there was no proper close above $8,200 and the 100 hourly simple moving average. As a result, the price started a fresh decline below the $8,000 support.
It even broke the $7,700 level and traded to a new monthly low at $7,661. Besides, the current price action is bearish, with an immediate resistance near the $7,900 level. Additionally, 50% Fib retracement level of the recent decline from the $8,157 high to $7,661 low is also near the $7,900 level. The main resistance on the upside is near the $8,000 and $8,100 levels. More importantly, there is a key bearish trend line forming with resistance near $8,050 on the hourly chart of the BTC/USD pair.
An intermediate resistance is near the $8,040 level, plus the 76.4% Fib retracement level of the recent decline from the $8,157 high to $7,661 low. Therefore, an upside break above the $8,000 and $8,100 levels is must for a decent recovery in bitcoin. The next key resistance is near the $8,400 level.
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Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

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Binance.US - CryptoTrader.Tax Demo Automating Your Crypto Tax Reporting

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